thedetoxdr.com     |     home
About Us   |   Neurotransmitter Deficiency & Weightloss   |   healthy quiz   |   Dr. Tammy K. Brazil   |   Heavy Metal Toxicity   |   Hair Analysis   |   Urine Profile   |   Contact Us   |   Areas of health to examine   |   Consultation & More Information   |   DIAD Microscopy   |   Metabolic Systems   |   Immune System   |   Animal Hair or Fur Analysis   |   Our Next Seminar   |   EcoBiotics
Metabolic Systems
Metabolic Systems

 

Metabolic Systems Therapy
The question of proper nutrition is central to health and wellness. Many systems exist to tell us what to eat, and what not to eat. And while every one of these systems works well for some people, the same systems often fail to help, or sometimes even hurt, other people.
Research into metabolic Systems Therapy has its roots in the research of Dr. George Watson, who in 1972 published his findings on the relationship of blood pH and health in a book called, "Nutrition and Your Mind: A Psychochemical Response." In this book, he shows how various people who are either fast or slow oxidizers of key nutrients will create imbalances within the body's fundamental energy producing mechanism, the Krebs Cycle. He found that fast oxidizers present the carbohydrate-dependent building blocks of energy (pyruvate, oxaloacetate) much faster than they break down the fat and protein dependent materials (co-enzyme A). For this reason, fast oxidizers become balanced in their nutrition by eating more fatty, high protein foods of high quality.
Conversely, slow oxidizers tend to supply the chemistry of the Krebs Cycle with the fatty, beta-oxidation products (co-enzyme A) faster than the carbohydrate dependent substances. They tend to be brought back into balance by diets featuring higher levels of complex carbohydrates of high quality.
This system worked spectacularly well for many people, but not for others. William Wolcott, building upon the research and experience of Dr. William Donald Kelly, an expert on the nutritional treatment of cancer and other serious diseases, discovered another part of the picture. While some people's metabolisms seemed to be governed by oxidative rates, as expounded by Watson, others seemed to be governed more strongly by signals from the autonomic nervous system. Wolcott found that at a give time, an individual was either oxidative dominant or autonomic dominant. And just as there are fast and slow oxidizers, there are also fast autonomics (called sympathetics) and slow autonomics (called parasympathetics).
The final bit of the puzzle is that a person's response to specific nutrients is exactly opposite, depending upon which system, oxidative or autonomic, is dominant within them! For example, a fast oxidizer is nutritionally balanced by a diet featuring fatty, high protein foods, while a slow, autonomic type thrives on the same things. A fast, sympathetic autonomic, however, would be driven into deeper imbalance and distress by this diet, and needs the same sorts of foods as a slow oxidizer, namely, a diet high in complex carbohydrates.
Our office performs the testing to determine metabolic type, and offers dietary plans based on this information. You can also read Wolcott's recent book, "The Metabolic Typing Diet: Customize Your Diet to Your Own Unique & Ever Changing Nutritional Needs," for more information. Diet guidelines for Group 1 (Slow oxidizers and Sympathetic autonomics) and Group 2 (Fast oxidizers and Parasympathetic autonomics) may be requested from our office.

 

It would be ideal to learn and track your personal metabolic type, either from testing at our office, or with a practitioner in your own area. You should initially review the foods listed for Group 1 Metabolizers (Slow Oxidizers or Sympathetic Dominant) and Group 2 Metabolizers (Fast Oxidizers or Parasympathetic Dominant) and see which type of diet, historically, has affected you in various ways.

 

Metabolic function can be assisted in several ways. First, detoxification may help unblock critical enzyme pathways, allowing both for more complete digestion as well as more complete conversion of nutrients into energy, via oxidative phosphorylation of ATP. Second, reduction of pathogenic microbes via isopathic regression, probiotic terrain competition, and biological terrain shift, can greatly improve the entire sphere of digestive and metabolic processes. Copyright(c) 2000 Stuart Grace Natural Philosophy Research Group